What is Accidental Bowel Leakage?

Accidental Bowel Leakage (ABL), also known as Fecal Incontinence (FI), is the accidental leakage of liquid or solid stool. Accidents can range from large to small or just stains in your underwear. Some people experience urgency, which is a sudden, strong urge to have a bowel movement while others may experience passive soiling and pass stool without knowing it. ABL can also be connected to incomplete evacuation, which is when you feel like you can’t fully evacuate your bowels.

Are there treatment options?

Yes! There are many treatment options available, ranging from conservative treatment to surgery. Oftentimes the first step is dietary modification, medication or pelvic floor exercises. 

The Eclipse System

Eclipse System

The Eclipse System is a non-surgical therapy which offers immediate results for women experiencing loss of bowel control. The system consists of a vaginal insert which, when inflated, prevents the passage of unwanted stool; when deflated, stool can be passed normally. The insert is comfortable and can easily be inserted or removed anytime, offering immediate results while worn. You can learn more about the Eclipse System by visiting www.eclipsesystem.com or by scheduling a consultation with our office.



Medtronic Bowel Control Therapy

Medtronic Bowel Control Therapy

Medtronic Bowel Control Therapy (Sacral Neuromodulation delivered through the InterStim System) is a proven treatment option that targets the communication between the brain and sacral nerves. These nerves help control the muscles related  to bowel function. If the brain and sacral nerves don’t communicate correctly, bowels will not function properly. This can lead to symptoms of bowel incontinence. Medtronic Bowel Control Therapy targets these symptoms by modulating the sacral nerves with mild electrical pulses. To learn more about this therapy you can visit www.medtronic.com or schedule an appointment with our office.


Solesta

Salix

Solesta is a gel made up of dextranomer and sodium hyaluronate. Solesta is injected into the tissue underneath the lining of the anus, through a series of four injections, without any need for anesthesia. The entire procedure takes about 10 minutes and is performed in the office. The medicine works by thickening the tissue in your anal canal. For more information about Solesta, you can visit www.salix.com or by scheduling a consultation.